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The Top 7 SEO Things Small Businesses Screw Up

SEO mistakes are easy to make.SEO Mistakes Are Easy

Owners of small (and very small) businesses are usually highly skilled in what they do. But they often have insufficient experience with SEO. Despite our company name, there’s no “magic” in SEO, but it’s not intrinsically obvious either. I hope it’s helpful for you to know these pitfalls.

The Top 7 Things Small Business Owners Screw Up

1) Not starting SEO soon enough

Start your SEO as soon as possible.It’s very common for small business owners to recognize very early on that a website is indispensable to their business. They will often spend a great deal of time and effort in creating a website that is robust, full-featured, attractive, and even sexy. Often it will include a blog with months or years of laboriously crafted information.

But without SEO, all of that information may be inaccessible to potential customers. It’s like a Billboard in the Woods. Want to find out if your site is a Billboard in the Woods? Conduct a simple test.

Once you realize that your beautiful website can’t be found, SEO becomes a priority. And at that point, it may require you to make major changes in your website design, structure, and content. The sooner you start your SEO, the less work you’ll have to re-do on your site.

2) Writing for Google

Google's G logoYour audience is people: current and future customers or clients. But out of zeal to achieve high visibility in Google, many small business owners focus on Google instead of on their customers.

That can result in practices that violate Google’s standards, like creating doorway pages. It’s always a bad idea to try to fool Google into ranking you higher than you deserve. But even without that, thinking too much about Google and too little about your customers often results in content that goes overboard in terms of keyword inclusion.

Keyword stuffing makes a web page read awkwardly and creates a poor user experience which may well drive people away. A few years ago in Google’s Penguin algorithm update, they specifically focused on penalizing keyword stuffing.

3) Not understanding the customer

As business owners, we’re always focusing on what we do and the advantages or features of our products and services. It’s natural to write about that on our websites.

But that misses the point.

Don't put your customer tyo sleep by emphasizing features instead iof benefits.Customers don’t care what the features are; they care about what it will do for them. To get customer to buy from you or patronize your services, you need to explain what’s in it for them. What benefits you offer, not what features you have built into your products or services.

It’s also important to write with a customer focus in mind. If your web pages talk all about what “I” or “we” can do, it misses the marketing message. Your web content needs to talk about whatever desire, pain point, or purpose the customer has in conducting the search that brought him or her to your website. Good marketing copy is YOU-focused, not ME-focused.

4) Choosing unachievable keywords

Some keywords are dominated by big, national companies.It’s natural to want to focus your SEO on search phrases that people search for a great deal. Optimizing for a phrase that people search for hundreds of thousands of times a month instead of phrases that people search for 20 or 30 times a month. The problem with that is that such keyword phrases are usually way too competitive for a small business to compete with.

On the bell curve, keyword phrases that fall in the middle of the curve get the most searches, but are also the most competitive. Long tail keyword phrases — those out near the edges of the curve — can be finely tuned to focus on your unique selling proposition and good rankings are much more achievable for them.

Don’t optimized for car repair. Optimize instead for brake repair. And transmission repair. And each of your auto services. Even better might be to optimize for brake repair in [your town or county].

Don’t optimize for New Jersey lawyer. Optimized instead for New Jersey workers compensation lawyer. Or New Jersey child support lawyer. Or NJ real estate attorney.

5) Not writing enough

Copywriting for marketing and SEO is a valuable skill.Too often small business owners want to keep their pages short and “punchy”. You may recognize that people don’t have the patience to read a great deal of content. The Internet expression TL:DR has become popular lately. It means “Too Long: Didn’t Read”.

The mistake here is that people don’t read a web page the way they read a novel. They scan or skim, looking for subheadings to find the morsels that they are particularly interested in. If your copy is constructed well with frequent subheadings, it won’t be intimidating to the visitor on your site. And they can find what they need to know easily.

Beyond that, though, if you’re optimizing a page for two or three different but related keyword phrases, you need at least 300 words of copy to help Google understand what the page is all about. To include those keywords  on the page enough with fewer than about 300 words inevitably requires you to do keyword stuffing.

6) Having a single Services page

List of ServicesThis is a critical error I see a lot. In order to present the website from growing too large, a business will include a  page titled Services. On that page they may have a bulleted list of all the different things that they do, possibly with a sentence or two of description about each of them.

If a page is about everything you do, it can’t possibly be “all about” any one thing that you do. Let’s say your car repair shop does transmission repairs. If that is only one item out of a bullet list of a dozen or two services you offer,  Google is never going to want to show that page to somebody who’s looking for a transmission repair shop.

If, however, each item listed on your Services page links to another page that is truly all about that specific service, those are the pages that Google will like.

7) Forgetting about the code

Craft your meta description carefully.This is understandable. As a small business owner, you probably know little about HTML code — the computer code that tells a browser or phone how to display your page — and care about it even less. But there are certain things in the HTML code which the visitor to your site never sees but have a critical role in your SEO.

The page title tag is the most powerful place to have keyword phrases appear. That’s in the code; it’s not the main headline on your page.

The description meta tag often appears as a snippet in the search engine results even though it doesn’t appear on your visible web page. That can play significant role in whether someone clicks on your listing in Google or one of the listings below you.

There are a lot of coding techniques that can help your SEO. You ignore them at your peril.

8) Failing to monitor results

Google rankings can suffer unexpectedly.Your search rankings are going to bounce around a bit, and that’s inevitable. But if you’re not paying attention to them, and your rankings begin to slide, you may not notice it in your revenue numbers until much later. You should always monitor your rankings, your web authority, your competitive position, your social media presence, and your citations across the web. It’s also important to run periodic site crawls to reveal whether Google or other search engines are running into difficulty understanding what’s on your website.

Sometimes changes in Google’s ranking algorithms can begin to hurt you even though everything you have done up to that point is effective. For example:

  • Having a mobile-friendly website that’s easy to use on a phone was unimportant just a few years ago. Today it’s critical, and is a ranking factor at Google.
  • We didn’t used to pay too much attention to how quickly a web page loads in a browser, but now slow pages can hurt your rankings.
  • A few years ago, secure websites with URLs starting with HTTPS only applied to websites that collected personal information like credit cards and email addresses. No longer. Secure websites now enjoy a boost in rankings compared to those that are not secure.

As a small business owner, you can’t be expected to stay on top of every change in how Google ranks websites, but if you monitor your results you’ll know when something is going wrong. Only then can you take steps to fix it.

Rank Magic can help!

That’s rather a lot of stuff to be aware of and to deal with. And as a small business owner we know you have your hands full just running your business. That’s where Rank Magic can help.

If you’d like us to explore your website over the phone with you and highlight any problem areas you may not be aware of,  just give us a call. The call is free, but the advice can be priceless.

We welcome your opinion. Join the conversation in the Comments below!

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How To Write Great Meta Descriptions For Your Business

Writing desk
Meta descriptions are not used to directly determine your SEO rankings. However, they do convince searchers to visit your website. A bad meta description might undermine your web page — or your brand.

Below I’ve explained how your business can write great meta descriptions in order to  turn casual searchers into paying customers.

Recommended reading: 10 SEO Mistakes Small Businesses Make

Why are meta descriptions important to your business?

SEO makes your web pages rank well in SERPs. You then need to convince searchers that your business provides them with the result they’re looking for. This is what your meta descriptions do – meta descriptions are your sales people.

You need to produce winning sales pitches for you business by writing great meta descriptions for your web pages. Here’s how.

Start with the PSO approach

Before you do anything you need to get inside the heads of your customers. They’ve searched Google because they’re looking for answers. Your way to to make sure your business has these answers is to follow the PSO (Problem, Solution, Outcome) approach. I’ll use the example of health and fitness – something I’ve searched for plenty of times myself!

  • Problem: Your customers want to be fitter and healthier
  • Solution: How are you going to help them achieve their goals
  • Outcome: Make your customers see how your business has improved their lives

Here is an example of a meta description for a business in the health and fitness industry. I searched fitness wear to get the results:

Google snippet with a well constructed meta description tag.This brand is all about showing love to US made products. It knows that its target audience is searching for workout clothes. But it goes further. It sells itself as being exciting. The outcome? You’ll look so good in these clothes that “you’ll wear them all the time.” It’s just a shame that the number of brands in the title and meta don’t match.

Meta description length: Make sure Google doesn’t cut you off

A copywriter will tell you that one of the basic rules of writing is to deliver the right amount of content. Don’t go over the word count and don’t run short. You have to take the same approach with your meta descriptions.

If your meta descriptions are too short you’ve missed valuable space to sell the value of your business. If your meta descriptions are too long Google will cut them off, leaving half complete words and sentences.

You might have read that your meta description length is all about characters. And that your metas need to be up to 160 characters long – or 300 since the changes made by Google in December 2017. This is wrong. It’s all about pixels.

The reason that pixels are so important is that some letters and numbers are longer than others. This means you could have the right number of characters but still find your metas cut off. To make sure your meta descriptions are the right length keep to the following:

  • 920 pixels for desktop
  • 680 pixels for mobile

If you have a mobile responsive web design the same page will be used on mobile and desktop. This means the same meta will be used, which means the meta could be squashed. To get around this problem, use 920 pixels and then enable the viewport tag. The video below explains how to do this:

To be certain your meta descriptions don’t have too many pixels in them I recommend using a tool to view how Google will see them. My preferred tool is SEOmofo but there are plenty out there which you can use – a tool wouldn’t have stopped the below meta description from being terrible (the content is all kinds of awful), but it would have meant Sears knew it was too long:

Google snippet with a meta description that's tooo long

Focus on your customer – not your business

Too many businesses forget that their customers don’t care about them. What their customers care about is their needs. The structure of your meta descriptions will be formed from the PSO approach. The content of your metas needs to be inspired by your customers.

To convince your customers your business has what they’re looking for, your metas need to talk about and to your customers.

Product pages and blog posts need to tell your customer how your products are going to improve their lives. Gymshark is the top fitness and apparel brand on Instagram. I’ve picked a random page to show how Gymshark writes a great meta description:

Google snippet with a great meta description

The customer is the center of the content. It’s “your” back “your” all-important rest day. It’s playful and caring. But what’s really great about this meta is that it uses curiosity to create a great CTA – more on that soon…

Your home page needs to make a personal connection between your brand and your customer. The Fit Boxx is one of the top performing fitness brands on Exchange. I’ve looked at its home page to see how great the meta description is:

Google snippet illuistrating a good customer-focused meta description

Craft your meta description carefully.Your customers want to be told about the benefits of your products, not the features. In this great example, the customer is told that The Fit Boxx will provide them with the key fitness products they need “and more.” Not only that, the brand will deliver to their door.

All of the major questions a customer would have about a crossfit brand are answered in the meta. And the focus is purely upon the benefits. Now they just need to click through and find out how much this will cost.

Make sure you have a CTA

While it’s important to show your customers that your brand has what they need, don’t forget that your meta description is a piece of sales copy. In order to make sure you convert searchers into customers you need a CTA (Call To Action).

Include a Call To ActionThere are a number of top tips to writing a CTA that will give you a great meta description:

  • Use a command verb: These tell your customer to do something. Great examples include “buy,” “now,” and “visit.”
  • Include offers with a timescale: Giving your customer an offer or discount is always a winning sales tactic. Telling your customers they only have a limited time before it runs out encourages them to act, NOW!
  • Inspire curiosity: Another technique is to keep your customers in the dark (a little). Tease them by giving part of the message and leaving some of it open. While it may sound counterproductive, industry-leading marketer Neil Patel has explained that curiosity leads to increased sales

For more information on how to write a CTA that converts, check out the brilliant video below:

A great meta description will convince your customers that you have what they need, getting them on to your website where they can buy your products. Follow the guidance in this article and you’ll be writing great meta descriptions that will win you business.

Victoria Greene


Victoria Greene
is a branding consultant, freelance writer, and SEO content specialist. On her blog, VictoriaEcommerce, you’ll find an array of articles to help your startup make the most of ecommerce tactics to increase your revenue.

 

We welcome your thoughts and observations. Join the conversation in the Comments below!

How to Get Online Reviews

How to Get Online Reviews

How important our online review stars?

How important is it to get online reviews?

For more on the value of online reviews, see our infographic.

People use online reviews to pick a business

When searching online, people really do take online reviews into accout when deciding which listing to click on. For example, if you were looking for an Indian restaurant in Lake George, NY, this local 3-pack might well convince you to drive ½ hour south to Sarasota Springs. But if that’s too far, it’s an easy choice between the two local restaurants.

Avoid phony reviews

There’s an understandable temptation to sort of start the ball rolling by writing a review for yourself. Or to make up for a mediocre average star rating by creating some 5-star reviews.

Don’t do it.

Here are a few things to avoid – don’t do any of them:

How to get online reviews

I strongly encourage all small businesses to actively get online reviews. They can make all the difference between just getting found on Google and getting chosen.

What are third party reviews?

Third party reviews are reviews on websites other than your own. Reviews on your own website are referred to as first party reviews. I have no clue what second party reviews might be.

Some of the most powerful third-party review sites include Google My Business, Facebook, LinkedIn, and Yelp. You may like our post about whether Yelp reviews really help.

If a potential customer already knows your company name and looks you up by that, you are very likely to show up in the Knowledge Card at the top right of Google’s SERP (Search Engine Results Page). When that happens, your average review stars from Google My Business are clearly displayed.

Beyond the Knowledge Card, when someone searches for your company name they are also very likely to see your pages on Facebook, Yelp, LinkedIn, MapQuest, vertical directories, and other sites. To the extent that those listings display review stars in the Google SERP, they all work toward establishing your reputation and encouraging people to look at you more closely. Obviously, the more stars that show up on your own Google SERP page, the better you appear to be.

How to get third party reviews

Third party reviews on sites like Yelp can help both your rankings and your conversions.

Ideally, your services are so outstanding that your customers are driven by their delight to want to provide positive reviews for you online. Pragmatically, we must admit that an unsatisfied customer feels more motivated to write a scathing review than a delighted customer is motivated to write a positive review. To counteract that, you will want to make it very easy for those happy customers to write about how wonderful you are. There are a few ways you can ethically increase the likelihood that satisfied customers will review you online.

  • Ask them. If they indicate a willingness to write a review for you, follow-up with an email to them which includes a link directly to your page on the third party site of your choice. In that email, tell them where to find the button or link to click to write a review.
  • Provide links on your website to your pages on third party sites that display reviews. You may increase the likelihood of people clicking to leave you a review with a call to action suggesting that.
  • Include a link in your email signature block.  That way, every email you send to a client includes a link to your page at one or more third-party sites that host online reviews.
  • Write reviews of others yourself. When you write a review for a strategic partner who may refer business to you or to whom you refer business, seeing that review may motivate them to write a review for you in return. The same thing applies to businesses in your networking circle. An honest positive review might make them feel at least slightly obligated to return the favor.

What are first party reviews?

First party reviews are simply reviews that appear on your own website as opposed to anyplace else.  BXB Media wrote a nice comparison of first party and third party reviews. And if you have them coded properly with  schema markup, Google will display your review stars in SERPs.

 A couple of quick warnings are due, though.

  1. You may not apply structured coding reviews you copy onto your website from somewhere else. That violates Google’s terms of service and you will suffer for it.
  2. For reasons only known to Google, reviews on your home page will not be reflected with review stars in Google’s SERPs. Review stars only appear when your internal pages show up in search results.

If you do it properly, however, those review stars showing up on Google can make a big difference in how many potential customers click on your listing, even if you’re not the first one. Here’s an example for one of our clients in a local search for floor tile repair. Which listing would you be likely to click on first?

Customer reviews on your website can greatly increase the number of clicks you get when people search for what you do.How to get first party reviews

I caution that this needs to be “done right”. Potential customers, and Google itself, are aware that you control your website and may be suspicious that the reviews displayed there are somewhat less than honest. So the first rule is to heed the two warnings in the paragraph above. Google explains that:

Google may display information from aggregate ratings markup in the Google Knowledge Cards. The following guidelines apply to review snippets in knowledge cards for local businesses:

  • Ratings must be sourced directly from users.
  • Don’t rely on human editors to create, curate or compile ratings information for local businesses. These types of reviews are critic reviews.
  • Sites must collect ratings information directly from users and not from other sites

The last item above means you can’t just take testimonials customers have sent to you and enter them onto your website yourself and apply structured coding to them. They really need to be gathered directly from your customer and entered on your web pages automatically. That’s to prevent you from cherry-picking only good reviews to display on your site.

The tool we prefer here at Rank Magic is Yext Reviews. As part of their location platform subscription program, they provide an automated review gathering form and a widget on your website. You can direct customers to the form and the reviews they enter will be automatically displayed on whichever pages of your site you have placed the widget on.

An added advantage of the Yext platform is that it alerts you anytime someone writes a review for you in either your first party reviews or any of the third party review sites in their network. I’ve written recently about how important is is too know when a new review is written so you can replay to it promptly.

Rank Magic can help.

Contact us to find out how we can help review stars make you a “star” on Google.

I welcome you to join the conversation in the Comments section below.

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Hidden Sabotage for Local Businesses: Duplicate Listings

Hidden Sabotage for Local Businesses: Duplicate Listings

What are duplicate listings?

Duplicate listings or citations don't help your business. They hurt.

Online citations or listings of your business are critical for local search optimization. Even Google says so. Almost all local businesses have at least some duplicate listings out there. Sometimes they occur because of a change in the name of your business. Sometimes they can be caused by a simple phone number change. Very often they occur because you moved.

And I’ll bet you have more listings or citations out there than you realize. You’re probably listed in places you’ve never submitted your business to. Many local search engines, directories, maps & apps gather business information from other sources, known as “aggregators”. There are many aggregators out there, including the White Pages, Dun & Bradstreet, and more.

Duplicate listings can happen for a number of different reasons.

  • Some people have been known to purposely create duplicate listings in the hope that would improve their local search visibility. (It won’t.)
  • Sometimes online citations can be picked up from multiple sources and contain slight variations.
  • It’s not common to see one listing with an a street address on “Main St.” and another  with the same address listed as “Main Street”.
  • Occasionally a business owner will create a duplicate listing because they forgot that a listing had been created at some point in the past.
  • Duplicates can also occur if a business goes through a merger/acquisition, rebrands itself, moves to a new location, or changes phone numbers.
  • Sometimes business owners create duplicate listings because of a lack of understanding. For example, a plumber may create one listing for water heater repairs and another for drain cleaning. But that’s a violation of Google’s guidelines against creating multiple listings for a single location.

What’s wrong with duplicate listings?

Don’t assume that duplicate listings mean that your business is easier to find online or that they will help your search visibility. They don’t help – they hurt.

Duplicate listings and online citations may be hurting you without you even knowing.Inconsistent NAP

When there are duplicate listings out there, they usually contain inconsistent NAP (name, address, phone) information. The duplicate may have a previous address, a bad or missing phone number, or a confusing variation on your company name. You have no control over whether people finding your online citation are finding the correct one or an incorrect one.

Customer address confusion

You’ll find that most duplicate listings are duplicated because they have non-matching addresses. This may be because you have moved and some of those online citations are simply out of date. You don’t want customers going to your old address! It may also be because some citations may be missing your street address, which leads to an obvious problem of people finding you.

Lost phone calls

Online reviews are important. Don't let duplicate citations dilute their value.

I find that quite a few duplicate online citations are either missing the phone number completely, or have an old, expired number. Some mistake of fax number for a phone number. The number of phone calls you miss from prospective customers or clients as a result is impossible to estimate.

Online reviews impacted

Duplicate listings can dilute the impact of your online customer reviews. People don’t only look at the number of stars you have, but also the number of reviews. People treat a five star rating to be a more likely representation of a business when it’s the average of a dozen reviews then when it comes from only one. Duplicate listings spread your reviews out, so that none of them represents all of your reviews.

The snowball effect

When a duplicate occurs on an aggregator like Dun & Bradstreet, the duplicate citations get sent out to all of the publishers that rely on the information from that aggregator. That single duplicate may snowball into anywhere from two or three to dozens of citations across the web.

Google rankings can suffer as a result of duplicate listings.

Search rankings lost

When Google or other search engines find duplicate and inconsistent listings for you out there, they can’t tell which one to trust. If they’re not sure which address is right for you, they’re more likely to rank you lower than you deserve rather than risk providing bad information at the top of their search results.

How to recover from duplicate listings

Duplicate dogs are fine. Duplicate istings? Not so much.Awareness

Obviously you can’t recover from duplicate listings unless you know they exist. You might uncover them by manually searching for yourself at lots of local search engines, directories, maps and apps to see if you’re listed multiple times in any of them. Search Engine Land, in their Definitive Guide to Duplicate Research for Local SEO, offers instructions on how to identify duplicate listings. That’s an eleven-step manual procedure involving online research and working with an Excel spreadsheet.

Don't let duplicate listings sabotage your local search rankings.Suppression

Once you’ve identified duplicate listings out there, it’s important that you suppress them. When you do that, be sure to suppress the ones that are most inconsistent with other online citations for your business. You can search each individual publisher for how to notify them and request a suppression of the listing.

Making it simple and easy

If you have a Yext location platform subscription (fair disclosure: I am a Yext Certified Partner) you not only receive an alert when a potential duplicate is found, but you can easily suppress it right from within your dashboard. You can literally suppress multiple duplicate listings within just a minute or two.

Do you need help with this? If so, just get in touch to learn how easy it can be to manage your local listings when you work with us.

If you’ve had experience with any of these local citation management tools, we welcome your observations in the comments below.

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Don’t Show Up Missing on Google My Business!

Your Google My Business listing is a local business essential

Google My Business listings are essential for local businesses.If you’re a local business, dealing with your customers face to face, having an accurate Google My Business listing is critical. Google says this is one of the first things to do to rank well for local searches. Google says “The information in your listing like address, phone, logo, business hours, and website determine what shows up when people see you in Google Search and on Google Maps. See our blog post about getting found in local searches.

Too often information for small businesses on Google My Business is old or out of date. And when your NAP (name address, phone) is out of date or inconsistent with other citations across the web, that compromises your listing. It may even prevent your listing from showing up.

But worse yet is not having a Google My Business listing at all. If you’re a very small business or a new business, odds of not having a Google My Business listing are greater.

How to tell if you have a Google My Business listing

You might have a listing even if you’ve never created one yourself, so the first step is to see if you do. Start out with a simple Google search for your company name.  If your company shows up in the Knowledge Card at the to right, you have a listing.

Google My Business listings is found for this company

If this was your business, go to that listing and make sure everything you can fill out has been completed. Also make sure that everything is current, especially your NAP. AdviceLocal has published a nice set of things to do to optimize your listing.

Have you claimed your listing?

Compare the above good Google My Business listing with this one:

This listing hasn't been claimed yet.

I’ve highlighted the question: Own this business? — that only shows up if no one has claimed it yet. You need to click that and follow the on-screen instructions from Google to verify your listing

Verifying your listing

In most cases, Google will give you two options to verify the listing: by mail or phone. If the phone number on the listing is correct, that’s often the best choice. I’ve had several experiences where clients have selected the mail notification option, only to have to request it two,r three or more times because whoever sorts the company mail mistakes the Google letters for junk mail and discards them. However, if no phone number is included on your current Google My Business listing you may have to select the mail option. Exercise some diligence so that when the letter arrives from Google you’ll spot it. When you get it, follow the instructions to login and enter the PIN in your letter to verify your ownership of the listing.

Once Google confirms that you own the listing, log into it and make sure everything is filled out correctly and is consistent with how you’re listed everyplace else.

If you don’t have a Google My Business listing

When you search for your listing, if a number of listings about your business show up but there is no Knowledge Card about your business in the top right (like the search results page below), that’s an indication that Google My Business doesn’t have a listing for you.

No Google My Business listings exists for this company.

You need to create your listing

This isn’t as daunting a process as you might think, especially if you have a single location. If you have multiple locations, you’ll need to go through this process for each of them.

  1. Go to this Google My Business create-a-listing page and click on the green GET STARTED button.
  2. Enter your full business name and click NEXT.
  3. Enter your full address and indicate if you provide services at customer locations instead of at your business address. Many local service businesses operate out of a home office. You may want to hide your street address so customers don’t come knocking at your front door.
  4. Continue to follow the on-screen prompts until you get to the point where Google wants to send you a PIN by mail or phone. See the information above about verifying your listing.
  5. Once you get your PIN, enter it into your account to complete the verification. At that point you own and can manage your Google My Business listing.
  6. Next make sure to optimize your listing. Enter as much information as Google My Business will allow: logos, photos, business hours,  business description, and so forth. The more information you fill out, the more prominent your listing will appear. Make absolutely sure that your NAP is current and consistent with how it’s displayed everywhere else.

A quick note about consistency

When it comes to showing up for local searches, an essential factor is Google’s trust in your NAP. Some citations may have a previous address, some have a local phone number and others a toll-free number. Some may even have variations on your company name. When that happens Google isn’t sure which is right. If Google doesn’t trust it knows your current and accurate NAP, it will be reluctant to display you prominently.

You can check your listing at several dozen of the top citation sources – local search engines, directories, maps & apps – with our handy  scan here. If that scan reveals problems, we can help.

Please join the conversation below with your own experiences and opinions.

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